New products, Conferences, Books, Papers, Internet of Things

Posts tagged ‘WSN’

Weightless-N Open Standard Released

The Weightless SIG announced the publication of version 1.0 of the new Weightless-N open standard based on a low power wide area star network architecture. Operating in sub-GHz spectrum using ultra narrow band (UNB) technology, Weightless-N offers best in class signal propagation characteristics leading to excellent range of several kilometres even in challenging urban environments. Very low power consumption provides for exceptionally long battery life measured in years from small conventional cells and leading edge innovation in design minimises both terminal hardware and network costs.

Central to the Weightless proposition is its status as an open standard. Weightless is differentiated from all alternative proprietary LPWAN technologies by uniquely enabling a competitive, free and fair market that does not lock developers into using particular vendors or network service providers.

Details of hardware supporting Weightless-N as well as SDKs will be made available on the Weightless website shortly.

More information available here

Call for Participation I3SC 2015

The International Summer School on Smart Cars 2015 will be held at Seggau Castle, Graz, Austria, Sept 6 – 12, 2015.

Smart and self-driving cars will change our daily lives significantly and are expected to have a transformational impact on society by offering more convenience in traveling, accident prevention, improved road logistics, and completely self-organizing traffic with a vast number of fully autonomous and seamlessly interacting cars.

Realizing these visions requires substantial research on automotive embedded computing and networking in order to manage the significantly increased complexity of real-time information processing, to deal with the dynamics of highly mobile networks among vehicles and the surrounding infrastructure, and to provide the dependability and trustworthiness required for safe traffic and efficient transportation.

Topics covered by the Summer School are:

*    Autonomous driving and platooning
*    Smart infrastructure and smart environments
*    Vehicular networks and car2X communication
*    Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS)
*    Automotive hardware/software codesign
*    Automotive safety and security
*    HIL testing and simulation
*    E-Mobility
*    Experience from real-world scenarios

GOALS

The goal of this summer school is to survey fundamental and applied aspects of embedded automotive computing and networking for Smart Cars, as well as to identify novel opportunities and research directions in related areas through a series of lectures held by international experts. Participants will experience various relevant technologies during hands-on courses and will be given a chance to present their own work during seminar modules. The school will provide a great opportunity to network with other people working in the field, to meet distinguished scholars, and to establish contacts for potential future research collaborations.

PARTICIPATION

The target audience are postgraduate students, PhD students, master students, and young researchers from universities and industry all over the world who either want to enter or who already have experience in this exciting research area.

Prospective participants need to upload a description of their interests and background as described on the school website. Participants will be selected based on their work area and background, geographic  distribution, and date of application.

IMPORTANT DATES

May 18, 2015 – application deadline [extended]
May 28, 2015 – Notification of admittance [extended]
September 6-12, 2015 – Summer School


In case you are not interested in receiving more information on this topic, please write to smartcars [at] iti.tugraz.at

Post-doc Position at University of Trento, Italy

The D3S group at the University of Trento, Italy, invites applications for a post‐doctoral research position in wireless sensor networks.

In the context of WSNs, the D3S has been successful in bringing research results into real‐world, long‐term, operational deployments. Examples are the structural health monitoring of a medieval tower, and the closed‐loop control of lighting in a road tunnel. The scientific results of these projects received the Best Paper Award at IPSN (both in 2009 and 2011) and the Mark Weiser Best Paper Award at PerCom 2012. The WSN-based system deployed in the road tunnel has been granted an EU patent.

Other ongoing projects include: i) a project aimed at large-scale monitoring of the environment and the wildlife dwelling in it; ii) a cross-disciplinary project on smart spaces, iii) a follow-up project of the road tunnel deployment, investigating energy-harvesting devices and wireless actuation.

Although we emphasize real-world applications as a motivation and a concrete opportunity for the validation of our research, the latter is not limited to the immediate needs of WSN deployments. We perform a mix of curiosity-driven and application-driven research. The research challenges tackled by D3S span a broad set of topics, ranging from low-layer issues concerned with the characterization and design of communication protocols to higher-layer issues related with programming platforms and software achitectures for WSNs.

The successful candidate is expected to propose ideas and lead scientific efforts on ongoing research topics, and to coordinate the related activities of junior members of the team.

More information available here

PhD Student Positions in Wireless Sensor Networks

The D3S group invites applications for two PhD positions in wireless sensor networks (WSNs). D3S is a cross-institution research group focusing on dynamic, decentralized, distributed systems.

In the context of WSNs, the D3S group has been particularly successful in bringing research results into real-world, long-term, operational deployments. Examples are the structural health monitoring of a medieval tower, and the closed-loop control of lighting in a road tunnel. The scientific results of these projects received the Best Paper Award at IPSN (both in 2009 and 2011) and the Mark Weiser Best Paper Award at PerCom 2012.

Other ongoing projects include: i) a project aimed at large-scale monitoring of the environment and the wildlife dwelling in it; ii) a cross-disciplinary project on smart spaces; iii) a follow-up project of the road tunnel deployment, investigating energy-harvesting devices and wireless actuation.

Although we emphasize real-world applications as a motivation and a concrete opportunity for the validation of our research, the latter is not limited to the immediate needs of WSN deployments. We perform a mix of curiosity-driven and application-driven research. The research challenges tackled by D3S span a broad set of topics, ranging from low-layer issues concerned with the characterization and design of communication protocols to higher-layer issues related with programming platforms and software architectures for WSNs.

New PhD students are invited to participate in ongoing projects to gain experience and insight into real systems, and to identify novel, challenging problems whose solutions break new grounds. The D3S group, and Trento at large, provide a fertile environment for high-quality research: two of our PhD students received the Best Ph.D. Thesis Award at the European Conference on Wireless Sensor Networks (EWSN) in 2009 and 2012.

More info about the positions here.

“Wireless Sensor Networks for Developing Countries” Springer CCIS Book Series Now Available

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the First International Conference on Wireless Sensor Networks for Developing Countries, WSN4DC 2013, held in Jamshoro, Pakistan, in April 2013.

The 10 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 30 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on WSN applications/services for developing countries; mobile WSN; underwater WSN; VANETS; body area networks; energy harvesting in WSN; WSN and cloud integration; WSN and IoT; QoS and Qot; WSN MAC, network and transport protocols; cross layer approaches; security aspects in WSN; WSN applications in smart grid and energy management; WSN in structural health monitoring.

More info is available here.

Team develops tooth embedded sensor for oral activity recognition

nbvgdgrfFrom phys.org:

A team of researchers at National Taiwan University has developed a sensor for embedding in a single tooth. The sensor as the team explains in their study paper records movement using an accelerometer to identify different oral activities such as chewing, smoking, coughing, etc. The team presented their sensor at this year’s International Symposium on Wearable Computers held early this month in Switzerland.

As scientists develop ways to make electronics smaller, researchers find new ways to use them. In this new effort, the team in Taiwan has developed a sensor that is small enough to fit inside of an artificial tooth, or to sit astride a natural one. The current sensor developed by the team uses very tiny wires to carry data from the sensor to a computer—future versions will use Bluetooth to allow for a wireless implementation.

The sensor measures jaw movement, and because of that is able to identify different types of oral activities. Currently it is capable of recognizing (after  for each individual) the difference between chewing, smoking, coughing, eating and drinking. This, the researchers say, could be invaluable to dentists, doctors and other scientists. The device would allow a , for example, to monitor teeth grinding, a doctor to verify how much a person is eating or smoking, and a behavioral scientist to measure .

To verify the accuracy of the device, the research team enlisted the assistance of eight —each had a sensor affixed to a tooth and then was asked to perform several different activities (cough, chew , etc.) for approximately 30 seconds each while the computer analyzed the data and made a personal profile for them. Afterwards, each of the volunteers was then asked to engage in the various oral activities and the researchers report that the sensor and computer were 93.8 percent accurate in determining which activity was being performed.

More info here.

 

How Can IBM’s Approach To Sensors Change The World?

Around the world, the increased use of sensors — and the data insights they provide — is leading to better management of resources and increased efficiency. A recent article on Forbes.com highlights how IBM is creating smarter cities with sensor technology. The article also discusses how advanced application of sensors can be used to address any number of everyday urban challenges from finding a parking space to increasing access to critical information in the wake of a natural disaster.

Unfortunately, the widespread use of sensors can still be cost-prohibitive. Few organizations can afford to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars per sensor and companies need to be working hard on the idea of bringing the cost down to an affordable level. The key is to make it easier and cheaper for everyone to gain access to the sensor space.

Besides cost, there are two other barriers hampering the widespread adoption of sensors. The first is that much of the sensor industry is focused on the sensor base or the sensors themselves rather than combining all the components to present a complete solution. In many cases the end user or system integrator must put together different components, write the software and then embed it with the sensor hardware.

The second area of focus for many vendors is the big push for cloud-based data collection systems. However, many of these are generic APIs that work with any platform that is configured to use them.  By themselves they are good ways to visualize your data, but not in the context of any real analysis or domain-specific expertise.

The reality is the end user needs both preconfigured hardware and cloud-based monitoring combined to serve a specific purpose. Users want sensors solutions that are easy to install and setup with clear instructions that explain what they’re capable of doing. They also need sensors that are easy to connect to other software and can integrate seamlessly with sensors from multiple vendors.

To be successful, organizations need to provide cheap, easy, and complete solutions that are broad enough to work with other systems. Sensors and the valuable insights they provide could be the key to smarter, more efficient cities and societies. It’s vital to develop integrated systems that are more affordable and readily available.

More info here.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 916 other followers