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Posts tagged ‘IOT’

New Book: Intelligence for Embedded Systems, a Methodological Approach

The book, written by Prof. Cesare Alippi and published by Spinger is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary treatment of intelligent systems, teaching the reader everything from metrology to cognition. It shows students and engineers how to understand basic mechanisms and design advanced applications, feeding a digital world eager for intelligent mechanisms. It also introduces researchers to ideas characterizing the transition from one generation of intelligent devices to the next.

More details in the book page

IES Symposium 2014

The “Intelligent Embedded Systems Research Group” at the Politecnico di Milano, in Milan, Italy, directed by Prof. Cesare Alippi, is organizing a symposium on “Intelligent Embedded Systems” in the context of the IEEE Symposium Series on Computational Intelligence (IEEE SSCI 2014), a flagship international symposium of symposia sponsored by the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society (CIS) promoting all aspects of Computational Intelligence (CI).

In particular, the “Intelligent Embedded Systems” (IES) symposium will focus on recent achievements in computational intelligence towards embedded systems highlighting intelligent behaviours, including topics such as:
•Intelligence for embedded systems
•Computational intelligence for cyber-physical systems
•Intelligent fault diagnosis systems
•Intelligent solutions for Internet of Things
•Intelligent sensor networks
•Intelligent sensors and robotics
•Intelligent measurement systems
•Adaptive solutions to operate in evolving/changing environments
•Intelligent systems for real-world applications

For more information and CFP please see this and also this (pdf)

Call for Papers: IEEE Internet Computing Special Issue – Building Internet of Things Software –

As we equip people, places, and commodities with Internet-connected embedded devices that can sense information about the environment and subsequently take action, we will create the Internet of Things (IoT). The IoT will improve society and quality of life, but making this vision a reality requires interdisciplinary efforts in a range of scientific domains. Specifically, enabling the design, implementation, validation, and real-world use of IoT software requires that we embrace diverse contributions in coherent and practical development frameworks, possibly based on current and future standards. 

This special issue seeks contributions about recent or ongoing research efforts, experience reports, and success stories in enabling an effective development of IoT software out of the individual building blocks available in different communities. Topics of interest include: 

- design and modeling approaches and methodologies for IoT software; 
- programming abstractions and languages expressly conceived for the IoT; 
- development techniques for IoT software appropriate for different hardware; 
- platforms, from tiny sensors to the enterprise level; 
- approaches for composing and interoperating existing IoT functionality; 
- cross-layer IoT software architectures; 
- standards for developing IoT software; and 
- real-world deployments and experiences in building IoT systems. 

Important Dates:

Submissions due: 1 July 2014  
Publication issue: March/April 2015 

Please email the guest editors at ic2-2015@computer.org a brief 
description of the article you plan to submit by 15 June 2014 

Guest Editors: 

Luciano Baresi, Politecnico di Milano (Italy) 
Luca Mottola, Politecnico di Milano (Italy) and SICS Swedish ICT 
Schahram Dustdar, Vienna University of Technology (Austria) 

More information is available here.

Cisco, TI Expand IoT Partnerships

Cisco Systems and Texas Instruments have announced separate efforts to expand partnerships serving the emerging Internet of Things. TI named eight IoT cloud service partners and said more are on the way; Cisco launched a challenge for IoT startups and promised to work with the winners.

TI said it will work with 21emetry, ARM, Arrayent, Exosite, IBM, Spark, Thingsquare, and Xively to provide cloud services for customers of its chips. The company said it is continuing to recruit partners in IoT cloud services.

The move highlights how quickly new providers of cloud services for IoT are coming out of the woodwork with various skill sets and offerings. The other rapidly expanding area in IoT is in design services to handle technical needs of the broad variety of market sectors looking to adopt wireless sensor networks of various kinds.

About 15 companies are now offering some sort of IoT cloud service, many of them listed online, a TI representative said.

“They offer different levels of service, application and demographic focus areas,” said the TI rep. “Some have strong presence in industrial and some are more consumer focused…All of them provide Web interfaces with APIs to build cloud applications [and] some provide advanced business services as well,” he added.

Separately, Cisco will pick three winners in its IoT startup challenge, who will share $250,000. The contest spans work on IoT applications, analytics, management, and connectivity. Cisco will help winners develop, test, and pilot new technologies and potentially partner with or invest in them. The company is taking applications April 21 through July 1.

via Cisco, TI Expand IoT Partnerships | EE Times.

FlyportPro: The ultimate module for IoT/M2M (WI-FI,GPRS,LAN)

FPROThe IoT (Internet of Things) market is growing fast and manufacturers are rushing to meet the challenge, putting pressure on research and development teams. New products are expected to reach market quickly and at low price points in order to keep up with the competition.

“It’s a new era, where service is king. IoT is a brand new stream of business opportunities that create services on top of connected devices. And FlyportPRO is a game changer, reducing the risk, time and cost of a new IoT product” says Claudio Carnevali, CEO of openPicus.

FlyportPRO is a new system-on-module made by openPicus. The new module is extremely compact, programmable and internet-connected, so there’s no need for an external processor. It runs the openPicus software framework, reducing development time by months thanks to the free IDE (Integrated Development Environment.)

FlyportPRO has everything needed to manage sensors and actuators: Digital I/Os, Analog channels, a real time clock and memory onboard. It also can directly incorporate SD cards, USB devices and I2C/SPI advanced sensors. It’s available in 3 pin-compatible versions: Wi-Fi, GPRS and Ethernet.

More info here.

Why the ‘Internet of Things’ may never happen

From ComputerWorld:

Research firm Gartner says the “Internet of Things” will have 26 billion connected devices by 2020. Maybe. But connected to what? And how? Here’s what you need to know about the “Internet of Things” phenomenon.

There will be no ‘Internet of Things’, The label “Internet of Things” is used to describe Internet-connected devices that communicate without human involvement. For example, as you read this article, you’re using the regular Internet. You’re a human being who is communicating with another human being (Yours Truly), and this communication is facilitated by many other human beings (editors, web designers, engineers, etc.). Like Soylent Green, the Internet is made out of people — and computers whose main purpose is to help people use the Internet.

The “Internet of Things” is different mainly in that it’s not made out of people.

Let’s imagine a scenario 10 years into the future when the “Internet of Things” is supposed to be established. You come home with a hypothetical “smart toaster,” which connects to the Internet. You plug it into a kitchen outlet. The toaster boots up, finds the home Wi-Fi network and sends out a query to all the other smart devices registered to you. Your alarm clock, smart toothbrush, TV, smartphones, tablets, PCs, smart glasses, smart smoke detector, home automation base station, smart clothes, smart fridge, smart washer and dryer and smart kitty litter box each in turn introduces itself to the toaster, telling its unique identifiers and what they’re capable of doing. The toaster responds in kind. In the future, the toaster can send and receive instructions from other devices.

For example, you have friends over for breakfast and make several slices of toast. There’s a lot of heat and a little smoke, and your smart smoke detector suspects a fire. So it sends out a message to the other devices saying, in effect, “is anyone creating heat and smoke?” The toaster can respond the equivalent of: “Yeah, it’s me. No fire here and nothing to be alarmed about.” So the smoke alarm doesn’t sound.

“Things” are connecting to each other and interoperating without human involvement. That’s one consumery example of the “Internet of Things.” (There will be industrial and other applications on a massive scale.) The “Internet of Things” is a bad name because “things” don’t have their own Internet. They use the regular Internet. There is no separate “Internet of Things.” “Things of the Internet” would be closer. And “things that interact with other things without human involvement” would be even more accurate.

Another reason why the “Internet of Things” is a bad name is that the devices can make these connections without using the Internet. Some can connect peer-to-peer, or over a local network, without going online. The ability to connect to the Internet is not a necessary criterion for inclusion in the “Internet of Things” category.

Read the complete article here.

Google’s Vint Cerf defines Internet of Things challenges

logoWe are going to have to live through a period of mistakes and challenges before we can make any strong regulations about the privacy issues and other challenges the Internet of Things present.  That was Vint Cerf, vice president and chief internet evangelist for Google’s response to a regulation question at his keynote before today’s Federal Trade Commission’s workshop on the Internet of Things trend. The FTC workshop was examining the issues and challenges of everyday devices to communicate with each other and with people or “The Internet of Things” and ultimately how the agency might regulate that activity.

“Connected devices can communicate with consumers, transmit data back to companies, and compile data for third parties such as researchers, health care providers, or even other consumers, who can measure how their product usage compares with that of their neighbors,” the FTC stated.

Reuters noted that in announcing the workshop in April and soliciting comments, the FTC asked how such gadgets can be updated when security holes are discovered and how to weigh privacy concerns against societal benefits from aggregating data provided by health-tracking gadgets. Cerf was the keynoter of the workshop which also included FTC execs and representatives from GE Appliances, SmartThings, the Electronic Frontier Foundation and others.The issue of privacy was a hot one.  For his part, Cerf said he would not “simply assert privacy is dead” but rather that it will be increasingly difficult to achieve.

“Our social behavior is quite damaging…technology has outraced our social intuition,” he said. Cerf went on to say he wanted to “build a congressional comic book to help them understand the way in which the Internet works…a lightweight cartoon model to help people to understand what laws make sense.”

More info here.

ARM report: Businesses look to make money through Internet of Things revolution

From Techworld.com:

A report out today has found that an increasing number of businesses are exploring the economic opportunities that will be created by the Internet of Things (IoT) concept.

The IoT revolution is set to come about as an increasing number of devices come online, from kitchen fridges to road signs. Objects such as these will include sensors that gather information which can then be transferred over the internet to a central computer system or another device.

The 32-page report — conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit on behalf of Cambridge-based IoT chip designer, ARM — found that 75 percent of business leaders are actively researching opportunities set to come about through the IoT.

The report, titled The Internet of Things Business Index: A quiet revolution gathers pace, also found that 30 percent of business leaders feel that the IoT will unlock new revenue opportunities, while 29 percent believe it will inspire new working practices, and 23 percent believe it will eventually change the model of how they operate.

The study found that European businesses are ahead of their global counterparts in the research and planning phases of implementing IoT. Meanwhile, manufacturing is the leading sector when it comes to research and implementation of IoT technologies, driven in part by the need for real-time information to optimise productivity. One in four manufacturing companies already has a live IoT system in place.

“The self-stocking intelligent fridge is a step closer to becoming an everyday reality,” said James Chambers, editor of the report. “Conversations about IoT are clearly moving on. Two in five executives are now telling us that they discuss IoT regularly. Whether we will all end up wearing clothes connected to the internet remains to be seen – but it’s hard to think of any business that can’t be part of the IoT revolution.”

More info here.

 

Exploring the Impact of the Internet of Things

10wtiFeatureInternetofThings-1380725054454From IEEE’s The Institute:

The “next big thing” is the Internet of Things, a world of networked devices equipped with sensors and radio-frequency identification aimed at interconnecting all things electronic to make them more intelligent and programmable. About 50 billion machines and devices could be linked by 2020, according to Cisco Systems, a leader in the IoT movement. Such smart devices are already being used, for example, to check soil moisture in vineyards, control the carbon emission of factories, alert drivers to traffic jams, and monitor patients’ blood pressure—all without human intervention. But people will have a major role to play as they generate and use the data coming from these myriad devices.

While the IoT offers plenty of business opportunities, it also, naturally, presents challenges for engineers, who must build ever more complex systems, deal with a lack of standards, and figure out ways to analyze the deluge of data. Societal issues also intrude, such as the need to keep personal information private while regulating who uses it and for what purpose. These and other issues are why the IEEE Future Directions Committee, the organization’s R&D arm, recently launched its IoT initiative.

“IoT offers the possibility for IEEE members and its societies to integrate their knowledge and skills to create value and impact industry,” says IEEE Member Roberto Minerva, chair of the initiative’s working group. “Applications of IoT are wide-ranging; specialists are needed to develop and improve specific technologies while others work with a more general system view. In addition, the interdisciplinary challenges posed by IoT could be a means to creating larger synergies within IEEE, especially in the areas of education, conferences, and publications.” Minerva is head of innovative architectures in the strategy department of Telecom Italia, in Turin, Italy.

“The idea behind the initiative is to develop ‘thought leadership’ in the marketplace,” adds Harold Tepper, senior program manager for IEEE Future Directions, in Piscataway, N.J. “Then, when people want to know more about IoT, they think of IEEE as the place to go for information, whether it’s papers in the IEEE Xplore Digital Library or its videos and conferences.”

To that end, the group has developed a website, organized a conference, and is about to launch a journal.

More info here.

How Big The Internet Of Things Could Become

From ReadWrite:

75 billion.

That’s the holy-@$#! number of devices that Cisco believes will be connected to the Internet of Things by 2020. That’s 9.4 devices for every one of the 8 billion people that’s expected to be around in seven years.

To help put that into more perspective, back in Cisco also came out with the number of devices it thinks were connected to the Internet in 2012, a number Cisco’s Rob Soderbery placed at 8.7 billion. Most of the devices at the time, he acknowledged were the PCs, laptops, tablets and phones in the world. But other types of devices will soon dominate the collection of the Internet of Things, such as sensors and actuators.

By the end of the decade, a nearly nine-fold increase in the volume of devices on the Internet of Things will mean a lot of infrastructure investment and market opportunities will available in this sector. And by “a lot,” I mean ginourmous. In an interview with Barron’s, Cisco CEO John Chambers figures that will translate to a $14-trillion industry.

Granted, Cisco has a lot of reasons to be bullish about the prospect of the Internet of Things: with product offerings in the router and switch space and a recent keen interest on building intelligent routing and application platforms right inside those devices, Cisco stands to gain a lot of business if it can get itself out in front of this newfangled Internet of Things.

It’s not just Cisco talking up the Internet of Things: late last week, Morgan Stanley published a big 29-page research note on the topic that sought to at once define the Internet of Things and also quantify its size, growth and potential to make money.

Morgan Stanley’s brief was bullish as a whole, though it did deliver expectations from other companies that weren’t quite so high as Cisco’s: “Intel (INTC) forecasts that the Internet of Things will represent a 3.8-billion device opportunity by 2015 (including mobile computing i.e., tablets, smartphones…) and ABI research forecasts that number will reach 30 billion by 2020.”

Read the whole article here.

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