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Archive for the ‘wsn-development’ Category

WSNWARE – Java Middleware for Wireless Sensor Networks

WSNWARE is an open source Java/OSGi middleware, designed for monitoring, controlling and standardizing Wireless Sensor Network.

WSNWARE is a normalized message oriented middleware, messages are transformed by incoming/outgoing adapters, which are specific to the application (as RAW packet is).

WSNWARE aims to provide a standardized access and representation of the network, its nodes and equipment (i.e. sensors). It comes with a set of tools and components which enable rapid development (i.e. create GUI, applets, web services, REST services) and easily bind to new modules.

The OSGI framework has been selected as container for WSNWARE modules, although the library and most of the components are designed as POJO and may be easily integrate in standalone (non-OSGI) contexts.

WSNWARE provides a set of bundles which can be used by developers for developing high-level WSN applications in RAD style, improved by OSGi modularization and management.

Ready-to-use platform adapters and real-world samples, are provided as well:

  • TinyOS2, Java.comm RXTX and their examples,
  • high level filters (statistical, noise-channel),
  • GUI expositors (real-time tables, charting),
  • GUI controllers and a dynamic IDE,
  • Multilateration application example

More info here.

TRMSim-WSN, Trust & Reputation Models Simulator for Wireless Sensor Networks

TRMSim-WSN (Trust and Reputation Models Simulator for Wireless Sensor Networks) is a Java-based simulator aimed to test Trust and Reputation models for WSNs.

It provides several Trust and Reputation models and new ones can be easily added.It allows researchers to test and compare their trust and reputation models against a wide range of WSNs. They can decide whether they want static or dynamic networks, the percentage of fraudulent nodes, the percentage of nodes acting as clients or servers, etc.It has been designed to easily adapt and integrate a new model within the simulator. Only a few classes have to be implementend in order to carry out this task.

More info here.

IOT Top 100

Postscapes has compiled a list of 100 contributors and supporters influencing the IOT. Submissions and votes are open! Dear Readers feel free to help extend/sort the list.

Cheers, WSNBlog Team

 

 

BuildSys 2011: Call for papers

3rd ACM Workshop On Embedded Sensing
Systems For Energy-Efficiency In Buildings
Seattle, WA, USA
November 1, 2011
Co-located with ACM SenSys 2011

The World is increasingly experiencing a strong need for energy consumption reduction and a need for efficient use of scarce natural resources. Official studies report that buildings account for the largest portion of World’s energy expenditure and have the fastest growth rate. Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) play a key role in enabling energy-saving systems in buildings and surrounding spaces by providing a reliable, cost-effective and extensible solution that can be placed in existing as well as new structures and can be controlled via the Internet.

Important Dates
* Paper submission deadline: July 30, 2011
* Notification of acceptance: August 31, 2011
* Camera Ready Due: September 15, 2011
* Workshop date: November 1, 2011

*** New this year: Demo session! ***

We solicit both papers AND demos that focus on new techniques and technologies capable of improving the global energy efficiency of buildings leveraging connected sensing systems, networks, and devices. Technical papers will be presented on November 1, 2011, and the demo session will be co-located with ACM SenSys on November 3, 2011.

For more info, go to the workshop webpage

TweetControl: Control Anything with Twitter

TweetControl App by ThingSpeak(Reposted from thingspeak.com)

We are ready to release a new app for the ThingSpeak Platform! The new app is called TweetControl – this app listens to Twitter for hashtags (#awesome)  and allows you to control anything that you can imagine. TweetControl is a mash up of  ”The Internet of Things” and social networking.  We were inspired by an early ioBridge project created by Matt Morey in July 2009 that used Twitter for home automation. Matt could control lights or turn on his furnace using Twitter. Now that Twitter has a Streaming API, we were able to build a scalable service to control anything in real-time via a social network.

Imagine an “Easy Button” for Twitter. All you have to is Tweet a hashtag from your Twitter account to control anything that has a web service API. The applications for TweetControl are endless, and we are excited to see what you come up with. The documentation for TweetControl is available on the ThingSpeak Community site to help you get started.

iPhone Radiation Dock Will Help Japan Track Impacts of Nuclear Crisis

Japan is still reeling from the nuclear radiation issues following the record-setting earthquake experienced last month. To help, one collective has come up with an interesting device — a portable Geiger counter that docks with an iPhone. By calling your iPhone, you can listen to the familiar clicks that tell just how much radiation is present in a particular area.

The basic idea behind iGeigie is to attach a Geiger counter to an iPhone so that it can be a tool for citizen scientists to collect information about radiation levels where there currently is no data being collected. 

RTDN.org, “a collective voice helping others stay informed,” is behind the project. It is a website providing an aggregate feed of nuclear radiation data from various sources including government groups, NGOs and citizen scientists. They currently have a Kickstarter campaign going to raise funds for a sensor network.

The basis of the project is that there are still many areas where information about radiation levels is not being collected. The sensor network would fill in those gaps. Devices would be sent out to tech-savvy people who will help collect and submit information so that anyone — from the average Joe to nuclear scientists — can use it to come up with patterns and solutions.

The group is about 1/3 of the way to their $33,000 project goal, and you can help out.

iGeigie is certainly an interesting device to help push this sensor network forward.Dvice has a video of a panel discussion at New Context Conference in Tokyo, where a 5.3 aftershock hit while RDTN co-founder Aaron Huslage explained the merits of the project.

More info here.

What if buildings could autonomously react to climatic changes?

Intelligent buildings reacting autonomously to temperature variations or precipitation forecasts, car traffic being diverted because ozone concentrations are reaching hazardous levels, or street lighting reacting to the passage of vehicles: these are some of the technological developments that will no longer depend on complex, expensive infrastructures. The EMMON project, led by Critical Software, is developing wireless sensor networks that will enable intelligent and proactive automated responses to data from a wide variety of cheap and reliable sensors.

Last December the EMMON Consortium unveiled the largest wireless sensor network in Europe, demonstrating a functional prototype with no less than 303 tiny sensors in a single room, gathering detailed, real time information on temperature, humidity and ambient light.

“This functional prototype demonstrates the integration of a number of core components, from embedded wireless sensors all the way through to the control station. The prototype, which is the largest single location wireless sensor network in Europe, was integrated and demonstrated at the Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto (ISEP), in the CISTER research unit, one of the main scientific partners of the project”, said Délio Almeida, the Project Coordinator from Critical Software.

The EMMON technology has very wide potential, including the ability in the near future to monitor not only the ambient conditions in the vicinity of buildings, bridges and tunnels, but also their very structures. Early warning of their degradation has obvious implications for the avoidance of disasters.

One major advantage of EMMON over existing technologies, such as they are, is that it doesn’t require expensive modifications to the structures being monitored, nor the installation of cabling. It is naturally much cheaper and quicker to upgrade such systems in the future.

The project’s final demonstration is currently being planned, in consultation with a number of organizations whose opinions on the requirements have been valuable. These include CCDR-N (responsible for environmental monitoring in the Northern region of Portugal), Living PlanIT (responsible for Smart City, from Paredes), Living Lab Malta (Malta Smart City), the National Forestry Authority (AFN), Brazil’s National Water Agency (ANA) and the National Civil Protection Association (ANPC).

Pedro Braga, the project’s Technical Manager, issued this appeal to the wider community: “The next step will most likely involve the implementation of a wireless network of environmental sensors, spread across a European city. Despite the breadth of the existing consortium, we are very interested in talking to other institutions, be they national or international, about the hosting of the final EMMON demonstrator. This hosting could include playing the role of end-users for this technology. One attraction would be the leave-behind potential of the demonstrator”.

This 36 month R&D project (www.artemis-emmon.eu) is jointly funded by the 7th Framework Programme of the European Union, the ARTEMIS JU and the Member States. The consortium comprises nine European partners. There are three Universities (Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Portugal; Trinity College Dublin, Ireland and Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece), a Research & Development Institute (Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Técnicas de Gipuzkoa, Spain) and five representatives of Industry (Critical Software S.A., Portugal; Intesys Ltd and Critical Software Technologies Ltd, United Kingdom; SESM S.c.a.r.l., Italy and Akting Ingeniaritza S.L., Spain).

More info here.

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