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Archive for February, 2012

CFP: ACM SenSys 2012

Toronto, Canada - November 6-9, 2010
 
The ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems (SenSys 2012) solicits innovative research papers on the systems issues of networked, embedded sensing and control.
 
This is an exciting time in the development of the conference, as we reach the 10th anniversary of the first conference held in Los Angeles.  ACM SenSys brings together academic industry, and government professionals to a premier single-track, highly selective forum on sensor network design, implementation, and application.
 
We seek technical papers describing original ideas, groundbreaking results and/or quantified system experiences involving sensor systems. SenSys takes a broad systems perspective of sensor applications and systems. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:
 
 - Experience with real-world deployments and applications
 - Resource management and OS support for sensing systems
 - Energy management and harvesting for long-term operation
 - Innovative sensing applications across broad areas (e.g., environmental
   monitoring, mobile healthcare, transportation, education)
 - Wireless communication systems and protocols for sensor networks
 - Sensor systems leveraging smart phones, body area networks, RFIDs,
   robots, etc.
 - Sensing technologies for pervasive computing
 - Sensor network measurement and characterization
 - Programming paradigms and models for distributed sensing
 - Sensor network debugging, fault-tolerance and reliability
 - Sensing, actuation and control in cyber-physical systems
 - Distributed sensor data storage, retrieval, processing and management
 - Approaches to sensor network architecture
 - Sensor data quality, integrity, and trustworthiness
 - In-network data reduction, inference, and signal processing
 - Security and privacy in sensor networks
 - Time and location estimation and management
 
Submissions will be judged on originality, significance, clarity, relevance, and correctness. In addition to citing relevant, published work, authors must relate their submissions to relevant submissions of their own that are simultaneously under review for this or other venues.
More info at http://sensys.acm.org/2012/

IPSN PHD FORUM – CALL FOR EXTENDED ABSTRACTS

IPSN 2012 – the 11th ACM/IEEE Int. Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Network (co-located with CPSWEEK 2012) – will host a Ph.D. Forum on Sensor Network Research. The Forum will provide an opportunity for Ph.D. students to present their dissertation research, including work in progress, to the sensor network community and obtain individual feedback from leading researchers in the field. The Forum will be structured as a series of short presentations by the students, followed by individual discussions, feedback, and advise. The student presentations will be interleaved with speeches by leading researchers, who will provide their own perspectives on current and future sensor network research, as well as on how to best purse a Ph.D. in this field. Participating students will also have the opportunity to present a poster during the main conference to leverage further interaction with CPSWEEK attendees.

Current Ph.D. students in the early stages of their career are encouraged to submit a 2-page extended abstract about their dissertation research in sensor networking to be considered for the Ph.D. Forum. The abstract shall also include a one-paragraph bio of the student, along with information on how long he/she has been in Ph.D. school and the expected time until graduation. The student should be the sole author, although contributions of the advisor and others should be acknowledged. Submissions will be reviewed by the Ph.D. Forum committee to ensure quality, relevance, and potential benefit from attendance to the Forum. Authors of accepted submissions are expected to participate in person to the Forum – to be held on April 15th, 2012 – and to present a poster both at the Forum and at the main conference. There will be no separate registration fee for the Forum.

Submissions must be received no later than February 27th, 2012 via e-mail to luca@sics.se, with subject “IPSN12 PhD Forum Submission”. Submissions must be in PDF format, be written in English, of no more than two pages in length (all inclusive), and adhere to the IPSN formatting guidelines (http://ipsn.acm.org/2012/submission.html). The abstract should include the author’s name, affiliation, and email address. Submissions will be explicitly acknowledged.

More info: http://ipsn.acm.org/2012/phdforum.html

Sen.se

About Sen.se:

At Sen.se, we believe there is no such thing as the Internet of Things.

We rather believe in an Internet of Everything where Humans, Nature, Machines, Objects, Environments, Information, Physical and Virtual spaces all mix up, talk, intertwine, interact, enrich and empower each other in all sorts of ways. This is what we are building and we think that we are not alone.

This is why we have created Open.Sen.se an open platform for all those who want to imagine, prototype and test new Devices, Installations, Scenarios, Applications for this globally interconnected and immersive world. Designers, developers, tinkerers, students, hobbyists, R&D departments, artists, self quantifiers, dataviz maniacs, whatever your skills are, we tried to make Open.Sen.se easy to use and yet powerful for you. Needless to say Open.Sen.se is free.

However, Open.Sen.se is brand new and has wet beta paint all over. This is why we are only letting a very small number of people in at this time. If you are really eager to start using it, please fill out the Invitation request form.

Once upon a time, people at Sen.se used to connect Rabbits *. Now they want to connect everything else. Maybe you do too.

(*) If you don’t understand, it probably doesn’t matter.

More info here.

WoT 2012

The third international workshop on the Web of Things (WoT 2012) will be held in conjunction with the tenth international conference on pervasive computing (Pervasive 2012) in Newcastle, UK, June 18-22, 2012.

Continuing the successful Web of Things workshop series, this workshop aims at further exploring the use of technologies and principles at the core of the Web to provide methods for a seamless integration of physical devices. In particular, our goal is to foster discussion on systems towards a real-time Web of Things and the discovery, search, and composition of services provided by Web-enabled things. The “Web of Things” workshop solicits contributions in all areas related to the Web of Things, and we invite application designers to think beyond sensor networks and Web applications, and to imagine, design, build, evaluate and share their thoughts and visions on what the future of the Web and networked devices will be.

More on the workshop website

 

Energy Harvesting for Wireless Sensors: 1.6 Million Units in 2011. Where Next?

In 2011 the market for energy harvesters reached US$700 million, with the majority of the value going into consumerelectronic applications, where energy harvesters have been used for some time. Approximately 1.6 million energy harvesters were used in wireless sensors, resulting in $13.75 million being spent on this market segment. The next few years will see a growth in the adoption of energy harvesting for wireless sensors with the market for industrial applications reaching US$140 million by 2017. Wireless sensor networks will be as big as US$200 million with bespoke military/aerospace applications reaching US$210 million (Market data taken from the IDTechEx report “Energy Harvesting and Storage for Electronic Devices 2011-2021″, http://www.IDTechEx.com/energy).

The volume of harvesters (in units) sold into each of the market segments will vary significantly, mainly because of the different size/power output/specifications for each harvester in each market segment. For example, military and aerospace applications will account for approximately 70,000 units of high value harvesters in 2017, whereas industrial applications will reach over 40 million units.

More info here.

iDigi Device Cloud enables cloud connected devices over satellite networks with Iridium

From Digi’s blog:

The Iridium satellite network now supports the iDigi Device Cloud. This means that Digi devices with an Iridium data transceiver inside can now send and receive data via iDigi over the Iridium network.

The Iridium network is the world’s furthest-reaching network, so this capability extends connectivity to the remote corners of the globe and is faster and easier than ever before.

“The big picture is that we’ve made it ridiculously easy to create backcountry realtime environmental stations, operate autonomous terrestrial or oceanic vehicles or support advanced devices in the developing world,” said Rob Faludi, collaborative strategy leader for Digi R&D. “Developers can create high-tech interactions that persist though natural disasters because no local infrastructure at all is required, and deploy them in any spot on the planet. We say any app, anything, anywhere and we mean anywhere!”

Iridium and Digi create a valuable partnership– with Iridium operating the world’s furthest-reaching network and enabling connections in remote places and Digi, who continually pushes the bounds of technology in terms of what is possible through networks.

More info here.

IPSN 2012 Ph.D. Forum, Call for Extended Abstracts

IPSN 2012 – the 11th ACM/IEEE Int. Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Network (co-located with CPSWEEK 2012) – will host a Ph.D. Forum on sensor network Research. The Forum will provide an opportunity for Ph.D. students to present their dissertation research, including work in progress, to the sensor network community and obtain individual feedback from leading researchers in the field. The Forum will be structured as a series of short presentations by the students, followed by individual discussions, feedback, and advise. The student presentations will be interleaved with speeches by leading researchers, who will provide their own perspectives on current and future sensor network research, as well as on how to best purse a Ph.D. in this field. Participating students will also have the opportunity to present a poster during the main conference to leverage further interaction with CPSWEEK attendees.

Current Ph.D. students in the early stages of their career are encouraged to submit a 2-page extended abstract about their dissertation research in sensor networking to be considered for the Ph.D. Forum. The abstract shall also include a one-paragraph bio of the student, along with information on how long he/she has been in Ph.D. school and the expected time until graduation. The student should be the sole author, although contributions of the advisor and
others should be acknowledged. Submissions will be reviewed by the Ph.D. Forum committee to ensure quality, relevance, and potential benefit from attendance to the Forum. Authors of accepted submissions are expected to participate in person to the Forum – to be held on April 15th, 2012 – and to present a poster both at the Forum and at the main conference.

Submissions must be received no later than February 20th, 2012 via e-mail to luca@sics.se, with subject “IPSN12 PhD Forum Submission”. Submissions must be in PDF format, be written in English, of no more than two pages in length (all inclusive), and adhere to the IPSN formatting guidelines
(http://ipsn.acm.org/2012/submission.html). The abstract should include the author’s name, affiliation, and email address. Submissions will be explicitly acknowledged.

Important Dates

Extended abstract submission deadline: February 20th, 2012
Notification of acceptance: February 29th, 2012
Ph.D. Forum: April 15th, 2012

This Is NASA’s Cancer-Sniffing Cellphone Sensor

What if you could use your phone to test the air for toxins? What if you could monitor your health simply by blowing on it? Sounds amazing, right? Nanosensor technology developed by NASA Ames is going to make that a reality.

Jing Li, a scientist at NASA Ames, has been working for years on what will be the greatest phone accessory of all time. It’s a small chip (about the size of a postage stamp) that houses 32 nanosensor bars. Each bar is composed of a different nano-structure material. Because each sensor bar is unique it can respond to different chemicals in different ways, enabling it to not only differentiate between them, but also to monitor their relative levels, in real time.

In its current state (which is looking mighty close to production-ready), it’s housed in a small case that attaches to a smartphone. For legal reasons they wouldn’t say which smartphone it’s built to attach to, but you can probably guess. Eventually, it will be built to attach to many other popular models. The idea is to develop a low-cost version so that consumers can afford to have them for health and safety applications. But let’s back up a second.

This nanosensor technology was originally developed by NASA Ames for space applications. This is NASA, after all. The first usage was monitoring for fuel leaks around launch vehicles. They’ve been on the International Space Station since 2008, monitoring air-quality and checking for formaldehyde in the air. Future applications could include taking samples on asteroids and Mars missions. So that’s where it started, but the Department of Homeland Security is now funding this project in order to bring it back down to earth—and to consumers.

There are certainly military applications (the Department of Defense is funding an implementation where soldiers could wear these to alert them of chemical threats), but the cellphone implementation is aimed squarely at consumers. The chip only draws 5 milliwatts, which means very little battery-drain (the smartphone they tested it with can use the sensor for 8 continuous hours on a single charge). It’s primarily being developed to monitor carbon monoxide as well as chlorine, ammonia, and methane in your home.But these things could really be used anywhere because they’re so small. An app could automatically send data back to the Department of Homeland Security or other emergency services agencies, which would give them a big-picture look at a larger area—and let them know if a mass evacuation is needed.

More info here.

Wireless Sensors Monitor Brain-Waves on the Fly

A fighter pilot heads back to base after a long mission, feeling spent. A warning light flashes on the control panel. Has she noticed? If so, is she focused enough to fix the problem?

Thanks to current advances in electroencephalographic (EEG) brain-wave detection technology, military commanders may not have to guess the answers to these questions much longer. They could soon be monitoring her mental state via helmet sensors, looking for signs she is concentrating on her flying and reacting to the warning light.

This is possible because of two key advances made EEG technology wireless and mobile, says Scott Makeig, director of the University of California, San Diego’s Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience(SCCN) in La Jolla, Calif. EEG used to require users to sit motionless, weighted down by heavy wires. Movement interfered with the signals, so that even an eyebrow twitch could garble the brain impulses.

Modern technology lightened the load and wirelessly linked the sensors and the computers that collect the data. In addition, Makeig and others developed better algorithms—in particular, independent component analysis. By reading signals from several electrodes, they can infer where, within the skull, a particular impulse originated. This is akin to listening to a single speaker’s voice in a crowded room. In so doing, they are also able to filter out movements—not just eyebrow twitches, but also the muscle flexing needed to walk, talk or fly a plane.

More info here.

Flyport and cloud services

Internet of things becomes more and more intersteing. But what does Internet of Things really mean? The answer is simple: more connected devices such ad TV, DVD playes, cars and, of course, smartphones and tablets.

With Flyport, Internet of Things is more closer to you! Why?! Well, because, with Flyport, the wifi programmable module, you can now interface to the cloud services – ThingSpeak.

ThiDIY gives access to the ThingSpeak Services. ThingSpeak allows to draw online charts, to store and recall values and to use specific APIs to work with Twitter, or to send HTTP requests directly from the ThingSpeak servers.You can create private or public channels. Every channel can store up to 8 fields (the values) and creates charts with those fields. Every channel has a Channel ID, a Name, a Write API Key and a Description. The Write API Key is the most important information of the channel, since it allows to upload or download the field data.We created a public channel to share with you the results of this Application. You can also use the private channels to respect the user privacy.

You can download for free the Application Note to interface by yourself Flyport to cloud services!

More info here.

 

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