New products, Conferences, Books, Papers, Internet of Things

The D3S group at the University of Trento, Italy, invites applications for a post‐doctoral research position in wireless sensor networks.

In the context of WSNs, the D3S has been successful in bringing research results into real‐world, long‐term, operational deployments. Examples are the structural health monitoring of a medieval tower, and the closed‐loop control of lighting in a road tunnel. The scientific results of these projects received the Best Paper Award at IPSN (both in 2009 and 2011) and the Mark Weiser Best Paper Award at PerCom 2012. The WSN-based system deployed in the road tunnel has been granted an EU patent.

Other ongoing projects include: i) a project aimed at large-scale monitoring of the environment and the wildlife dwelling in it; ii) a cross-disciplinary project on smart spaces, iii) a follow-up project of the road tunnel deployment, investigating energy-harvesting devices and wireless actuation.

Although we emphasize real-world applications as a motivation and a concrete opportunity for the validation of our research, the latter is not limited to the immediate needs of WSN deployments. We perform a mix of curiosity-driven and application-driven research. The research challenges tackled by D3S span a broad set of topics, ranging from low-layer issues concerned with the characterization and design of communication protocols to higher-layer issues related with programming platforms and software achitectures for WSNs.

The successful candidate is expected to propose ideas and lead scientific efforts on ongoing research topics, and to coordinate the related activities of junior members of the team.

More information available here

EWSN 2015

The 12th European Conference on Wireless Sensor Networks (EWSN 2015) will be held in Porto, Portugal on 9-11 February 2015.

EWSN is a highly selective single-track international conference focused on publishing premier research results pertaining to networked sensing, broadly defined.

The organizers of EWSN 2015, the twelfth meeting in this series, are pleased to announce an updated scope that combines the traditional focus of this conference with emphasis on recent and emerging directions in networked sensing. These new and emerging directions include (i) study of networked sensing in the broader context of larger cyber-physical systems and Internet of Things architectures, (ii) investigation of mobile and human-centric sensing, (iii) exploration of large-scale data and information processing challenges.

CFP Highlights

* Extended Scope
EWSN 2015 will feature an updated scope, combining the traditional focus of this
conference with emphasis on recent and emerging directions in networked sensing.

* Updated Topics on Emerging Directions
In line with the extended scope, we are soliciting contributions to new and emerging
directions, such as: Human-centric sensing (e.g. crowd-sourcing/crowd-sensing, mobile
sensing) or big (sensor) data challenges (e.g. large-scale information processing,
analysis of sensor data).

* New Additional Paper Format
EWSN 2015 will introduce a smaller paper format for validated early ideas that can be
described by a more concise contribution. Therefore, we solicit two types of original
submissions for oral presentation: full papers (16-pages) and short papers (8 pages).

Topics of Interest

EWSN 2015 welcomes contributions describing original ideas, promising new concepts,
and practical experiences (experimental validation, rebuttal, and/or comparison of
existing approaches) that fall broadly in the following topics:

* Wireless sensor networks and protocols:
-Communication and network protocols
-Information and signal processing
-Software engineering for wireless sensor networks
-Programming abstractions and tools
-Hardware design and implementation
-Sensor network operating systems and resource management
-Cognitive sensor networks

* Sensor network applications and services:
-Sensing in cyber-physical systems
-Internet of Things
-Cooperative object architectures
-Novel uses of sensor data, including healthcare, body area networks, vehicular applications, and smart buildings
-Localization and tracking services
-Security and fault tolerance
-Sensor network middleware
-Models, systems, and experiences with humans as sensors

* Human-centric sensing:
-Crowd-sourcing/crowd-sensing challenges
-Mobile sensing
-Smart phone sensing applications
-Opportunistic, participatory, and social sensing

* Big (sensor) data challenges:
-Large-scale information processing, learning, mining, and analysis of sensor data
-Challenges in sensor data stream processing
-Networked data fusion challenges
-Prototypes, testbeds, field experiments

More information available here
Important dates

Paper registration: 8-Sep-2014
Paper submission: 15-Sep-2014
Paper notification: 16-Nov-2014
Camera ready: 7-Dec-2014

The book, written by Prof. Cesare Alippi and published by Spinger is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary treatment of intelligent systems, teaching the reader everything from metrology to cognition. It shows students and engineers how to understand basic mechanisms and design advanced applications, feeding a digital world eager for intelligent mechanisms. It also introduces researchers to ideas characterizing the transition from one generation of intelligent devices to the next.

More details in the book page

The “Intelligent Embedded Systems Research Group” at the Politecnico di Milano, in Milan, Italy, directed by Prof. Cesare Alippi, is organizing a symposium on “Intelligent Embedded Systems” in the context of the IEEE Symposium Series on Computational Intelligence (IEEE SSCI 2014), a flagship international symposium of symposia sponsored by the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society (CIS) promoting all aspects of Computational Intelligence (CI).

In particular, the “Intelligent Embedded Systems” (IES) symposium will focus on recent achievements in computational intelligence towards embedded systems highlighting intelligent behaviours, including topics such as:
•Intelligence for embedded systems
•Computational intelligence for cyber-physical systems
•Intelligent fault diagnosis systems
•Intelligent solutions for Internet of Things
•Intelligent sensor networks
•Intelligent sensors and robotics
•Intelligent measurement systems
•Adaptive solutions to operate in evolving/changing environments
•Intelligent systems for real-world applications

For more information and CFP please see this and also this (pdf)

Contiki-ipv6-rpl-cooja-simulationFrom Wired:

You can connect almost anything to a computer network. Light bulbs. Thermostats. Coffee makers. Even badgers. Yes, badgers.

Badgers spend a lot of time underground, which make it difficult for biologists and zoologists to track their whereabouts and activities. GPS, for example, doesn’t work well underground or in enclosed areas. But about five years ago, University of Oxford researchers Andrew Markham and Niki Trigonisolved that problem by inventing a wireless tracking system that can work underground. Their system is clever, but they didn’t do it alone. Like many other scientists, they turned to open source to avoid having to rebuild fundamental components from scratch. One building block they used is an open source operating system called Contiki.

“Contiki was a real enabler as it allowed us to do rapid prototyping and easily shift between different hardware platforms,” says Markham, now an associate professor at the University of Oxford.

Contiki isn’t nearly so well-known as Windows or OS X or even Linux, but for more than a decade, it has been the go-to operating system for hackers, academics, and companies building network-connected devices like sensors, trackers, and web-based automation systems. Developers love it because it’s lightweight, it’s free, and it’s mature. It provides a foundation for developers and entrepreneurs eager to bring us all the internet-connected gadgets the internet of things promises, without having to develop the underlying operating system those gadgets will need.

Perhaps the biggest thing Contiki has going for it is that it’s small. Really small. While Linux requires one megabyte of RAM, Contiki needs just a few kilobytes to run. Its inventor, Adam Dunkels, has managed to fit an entire operating system, including a graphical user interface, networking software, and a web browser into less than 30 kilobytes of space. That makes it much easier to run on small, low powered chips–exactly the sort of things used for connected devices–but it’s also been ported to many older systems like the Apple IIe and the Commodore 64.

Read the complete article here.

The D3S group invites applications for two PhD positions in wireless sensor networks (WSNs). D3S is a cross-institution research group focusing on dynamic, decentralized, distributed systems.

In the context of WSNs, the D3S group has been particularly successful in bringing research results into real-world, long-term, operational deployments. Examples are the structural health monitoring of a medieval tower, and the closed-loop control of lighting in a road tunnel. The scientific results of these projects received the Best Paper Award at IPSN (both in 2009 and 2011) and the Mark Weiser Best Paper Award at PerCom 2012.

Other ongoing projects include: i) a project aimed at large-scale monitoring of the environment and the wildlife dwelling in it; ii) a cross-disciplinary project on smart spaces; iii) a follow-up project of the road tunnel deployment, investigating energy-harvesting devices and wireless actuation.

Although we emphasize real-world applications as a motivation and a concrete opportunity for the validation of our research, the latter is not limited to the immediate needs of WSN deployments. We perform a mix of curiosity-driven and application-driven research. The research challenges tackled by D3S span a broad set of topics, ranging from low-layer issues concerned with the characterization and design of communication protocols to higher-layer issues related with programming platforms and software architectures for WSNs.

New PhD students are invited to participate in ongoing projects to gain experience and insight into real systems, and to identify novel, challenging problems whose solutions break new grounds. The D3S group, and Trento at large, provide a fertile environment for high-quality research: two of our PhD students received the Best Ph.D. Thesis Award at the European Conference on Wireless Sensor Networks (EWSN) in 2009 and 2012.

More info about the positions here.

The Open Garden platform consist of three different kits, each ready for a specific kind of growing plant scenario: indoor houses and greenhouses, outdoor gardens and fields and hydroponics plants in water installations.

The platform allows to control the state of the plants by sensing several parameters:

Soil moisture (Indoor & Outdoor kits)

Temperature + Humidity + Light (All kits)

Water sensors: pH, Conductivity, Temperature (Hydroponics kit

Then it uses different types of actuators to modify the state of the plants by irrigating them or activating lights and oxygen pumps:

Water pump + Droppers for Drip Irrigation (Indoor kit)

Electro valve + Sprinkler for Sprinkling (Outdoor kit)

Oxygen Pump + Growing Light (Hydroponics kit)

The nodes send periodically the information to the Gateway that uploads the data to a web server by using any of the available wireless interfaces WiFi, GPRS, 3G. We have also designed a web application that allows to store in a data base the information gathered and visualize it from a browser and iPhone / Android device. We have released it as open source code so that you can improve it and make it personal for your own product!!

Open Garden has been designed to work with both 220V Europe & 110V US.

via Open Garden – Hydroponics & Garden Plants Monitoring for Arduino.

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